Notes

Poster de Gordon’s War (1973), una de mis películas favoritas de la infancia: cuatro veteranos de Vietnam combaten a los traficantes de la droga en Harlem. Aquí puedes ver el tráiler.
Gordon’s War (1973) poster, one of my favorite movies in my childhood: Four Vietnam vets fight drug dealers in Harlem. Here You Can See the Trailer.

Poster de Gordon’s War (1973), una de mis películas favoritas de la infancia: cuatro veteranos de Vietnam combaten a los traficantes de la droga en Harlem. Aquí puedes ver el tráiler.

Gordon’s War (1973) poster, one of my favorite movies in my childhood: Four Vietnam vets fight drug dealers in Harlem. Here You Can See the Trailer.

73 Notes

Rostros que me gustan. Christina Ricci.

Faces I Like. Christina Ricci.
Rostros que me gustan. Christina Ricci.
Faces I Like. Christina Ricci.

120 Notes

2564 Notes

The Breakfast Club reimaginado con estrellas de la escena punk-rock de los 1980s (vía lowkeloki).

The Breakfast Club re-imagined by Brazilian artist Butcher Billy.

[http://society6.com/ButcherBilly]

Notes

Conmovedor. “Move On” por el trío israelí Garden City Movement (vía Sexless Crystals).

Moving. "Move On" by the Israeli trio Garden City Movement (vía Sexless Crystals).

58725 Notes

Cosas que me gustan. Bosques cubiertos de nieve.

Things I Love. Snow covered forests.

Photographs by Christian Gendron.

1 Notes

Figura de acción de Snoop Dog (vía Kidrobot).

Snoop Dog Action Figure (vía Kidrobot).

5 Notes

Estupenda animación de los 75 años de Superman (vía Geek Tyrant).

Animated Superman Flies through his 75 year History (vía Geek Tyrant).

2 Notes

Tatiana Maslany en Orphan Black.

Tatiana Maslany en Orphan Black.

166 Notes

Gabriel García Márquez (1927-2014) con Sergio Leone, Muhammad Alí y Robert De Niro (vía cinephilearchive).

Sergio Leone with Robert De Niro, Muhammed Ali, Gabriel García Márquez and Gianni Minà. 
Thanks to LoSceicco1976

Why did you decide to become a filmmaker? SL: My mother was an actress. My father was an actor and a director. I am the son of filmmakers. I was born with this bow tie made of celluloid on my collar.
And why did you decide to make westerns? SL: I had never thought of making a western even as I was making it. I think that my films are westerns only in their exterior aspects. Within them are some of my truths, which happily, I see, belong to lots of parts of the world. Not just America. My discussion is one that has gone all the way from Fistful of Dollars through Once Upon a Time in America. But if you look closely at all these films, you find in them the same meanings, the same humor, the same point of view, and, also, the same pains.
Which filmmakers influenced you, and what were your favorite films? SL: I must be honest and say that I was under the fascination of films. I was fascinated by all films, even the words of them. If I was to do a more-precise analysis of the situation, I have to admit that I was more entertained by the bad films than the good ones. Because when something is beautiful, it is there; it is finished; it is done. It doesn’t have to be touched or be worked upon. But if it is badly realized and not completely expressed, sometimes that is more provocative and interesting than when you see something that is perfectly and beautifully done. But if there is an auteur who influenced me—and there is only one—that is Charlie Chaplin. And he never won an Oscar. —Interview with Sergio Leone (1987) 


This is a fantastic footage. Film history right there: Gianni Minà with Sergio Leone and Robert De Niro on the set of Once Upon a Time in America.




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Gabriel García Márquez (1927-2014) con Sergio Leone, Muhammad Alí y Robert De Niro (vía cinephilearchive).

Sergio Leone with Robert De Niro, Muhammed Ali, Gabriel García Márquez and Gianni Minà. 

Thanks to LoSceicco1976


Why did you decide to become a filmmaker?
SL: My mother was an actress. My father was an actor and a director. I am the son of filmmakers. I was born with this bow tie made of celluloid on my collar.

And why did you decide to make westerns?
SL: I had never thought of making a western even as I was making it. I think that my films are westerns only in their exterior aspects. Within them are some of my truths, which happily, I see, belong to lots of parts of the world. Not just America. My discussion is one that has gone all the way from Fistful of Dollars through Once Upon a Time in America. But if you look closely at all these films, you find in them the same meanings, the same humor, the same point of view, and, also, the same pains.

Which filmmakers influenced you, and what were your favorite films?
SL: I must be honest and say that I was under the fascination of films. I was fascinated by all films, even the words of them. If I was to do a more-precise analysis of the situation, I have to admit that I was more entertained by the bad films than the good ones. Because when something is beautiful, it is there; it is finished; it is done. It doesn’t have to be touched or be worked upon. But if it is badly realized and not completely expressed, sometimes that is more provocative and interesting than when you see something that is perfectly and beautifully done. But if there is an auteur who influenced me—and there is only one—that is Charlie Chaplin. And he never won an Oscar. —Interview with Sergio Leone (1987) 

This is a fantastic footage. Film history right there: Gianni Minà with Sergio Leone and Robert De Niro on the set of Once Upon a Time in America.

Following